29 Breathtaking Icelandic Landscapes

Home » Destinations » 29 Breathtaking Icelandic Landscapes

Icelandic Landscapes

Seeing is believing. Icelandic landscapes have a wild beauty like no other. Having survived the merciless pounding from Atlantic storms, centuries of fiery volcanic wrath and freezing Arctic winter temperatures, Iceland emerged as one of nature’s greatest triumphs.

Boasting fairytale-like waterfalls, spectacular geysers, boiling mud pools and glacier lagoons, Iceland is a mecca for both landscape enthusiasts and photographers alike.

We visited Iceland in September, and our timing was just perfect. We beat the tourist rush, enjoyed great weather and captured early season sightings of the Northern Lights. Our two week Iceland road trip led us around the fringes of Iceland. We drove the famous ring road and had amazing opportunities to photograph the wondrous landscapes that Iceland is renowned for.

Here, we share our Icelandic images that invoked our most memorable moments in this stunning country.

Many of our Icelandic landscapes are for sale in our Etsy store … Take a look here.

Landscapes of Iceland in Photos


Detifoss

Detifoss waterfall close up with man looking on
Detifoss’ Rage

Glacial melts produce huge volumes of water which feed the magnificent waterfalls you can see all around Iceland. Some of the popular waterfalls in Iceland are: Detifoss, Selfoss, Skógafoss, Svartifoss and Goðafoss. And yes, you probably have guessed, ‘foss’ means waterfall.

Breathtaking Icelandic landscapes__Detifoss with a few people that look tiny on the opposite cliff
Detifoss’ majesty

Detifoss …100m wide, a drop of 44m and pumps out 193 cubic metres (193 tonnes) of water per second. Now that’s an impressive set of statistics!

Northern Lights

Iceland northern lights with overflying plane
Iceland’s Northern Lights (you can even see a plane tracking across the night sky)
Iceland's mystical northern lights
Iceland’s mystical Northern Lights

Who doesn’t yearn to see the Northern Lights? Surely one of nature’s marvels. Generally, for the optimum chance of seeing the Northern Lights in Iceland, visit from some time from late August to April, and hope your visit coincides with a period of solar activity.

My camera equipment used to take this shot was a Sony a7III with a Sony 24-105mm f/4.0 lens. At the time, the Northern Lights lights were reasonably static so I was able to keep my exposure times to around 4 to 5 seconds.

I had already decided before arriving in Iceland that I wanted to photograph the Northern Lights. So, with my trusty tripod in tow, I was able to provide that steady platform that is essential for those long exposure frames.

Voyager Sculpture, Reykjavik

Iceland-SunVoyager
Voyager Sculpture in Reykjavik at Sunset

This exquisite architectural masterpiece, in Reykjavik, depicts a Viking longboat. It is particularly photogenic at sunset and is one of the most recognised Icelandic landscapes.

Jökulsárlón Glacial Lagoon

Seagulls at Jökusárlon Glacier Lagoon with icebergs and seagulls

Jökulsárlón glacial lagoon

Jökulsárlón glacial lagoon is filled with varying bluish-hued icebergs and is a haven for both sea and seabirds. The lagoon forms a part of the Vatnajökull National Park which is classified as a protected area.

Iceland-Jokusarlon-Glacier floating icebergs on a lake

Jökulsárlón Glacial Lagoon

The dark arcs of the moraine with the blue-hued icebergs and turquoise lagoon waters make for some great photographs.

The mesmerising Jökulsárlón Glacial Lagoon formed around 1935 due to the rising temperatures causing the melt of Breiðamerkurjökull (a tongue of the Vatnajökull glacier. The lagoon surface area has doubled over the last half of its life. This concerning trend continues today and it is expected that the lagoon will eventually become a deep fjord.

Vatnajökull Glacier

Vatnajokull glacier seen over the black lava fields

Vatnajökull glacier viewed over the black lava fields

Vatnajökull glacier, in eastern Iceland, is the largest ice cap in Iceland with the largest thickness of ice being around 950m in depth, but on average is about half of this.

Selfoss Waterfall

Breathtaking Icelandic landscapes__Selfoss' cascading waterfalls

Cascading waterfalls of Selfoss

Did I mention a fairy-tale scene of waterfalls? Selfoss is this magical place. Gaze up the canyon and wonder at the myriad number of waterfalls that give this place such a mythical feel. This is definitely a memorable Icelandic landscape experience.

Selfoss waterfall and its many contributory falls

Selfoss’ fairytale-like waterfalls

Hafnarnes Lighthouse

Breathtaking Icelandic landscapes__Hafnarnes orange lighthouse with a cloud shrouded mountain behind it

Hafnarnes Lighthouse

Many of the lighthouses in Iceland are a vivid orange colour contrasting beautifully against the blue waters and dark volcanic earth.

Something worth mentioning, we geocached our way around Iceland which added a real fun element to the trip.

Hvalnes Beach

Black sands of Hvalnes Beach, Iceland
Hvalnes Beach

Miles of black sand beaches pounded by the Atlantic ocean make Hvalnes Beach seem a desolate and lonely place.

Hverir Mud Pools

Breathtaking Icelandic landscapes__Hverir steamy mud pools giving a hazy atmosphere

Hverir Mud Pools

As with Iceland’s ever-changing landscapes, the Hverir mud pools were yet another one of the country’s unique natural wonders. If you want to visit here you’ll need to make your way to the northern part of Iceland.

Breathtaking Icelandic landscapes__Hverir mud pools seen at ground level with steam rising up

Hverir boiling mud pool

Landscape around Hverir mud Pools

The landscape around the Hverir Mud Pools

Reynisfjara Beach

Breathtaking Icelandic landscapes__Reynisfjara Beach with the black lava sand and rock stack jutting up from the beach

Reynisfjara Beach

The long sweeping Reynisfjara Beach, in Eastern Iceland, consists of black lava sands, is a popular spot for Iceland landscape photography.

Icelandic Sheep

Breathtaking Icelandic landscapes_sheep eating seaweed along the shoreline

Icelandic sheep grazing amongst the seaweed

And let’s not forget about our four-footed friends. We found these sheep happy foraging amongst the seaweed.

Once a year, the ‘Rettir’ occurs. This involves the herding of sheep down from the highlands to a wooden enclosure. Here, the sheep are separated into smaller pens assigned to their respective owners. Finally, the sheep are then taken to shelters, keeping them safe from Iceland’s frigid winter.

Saurbæjarkirkya

Breathtaking Icelandic landscapes__ Saurbæjarkirkya grass roofed church with a cloudy mountain backdrop

Saurbæjarkirkya

Saurbæjarkirkya is one of only six remaining turf-covered stone churches in Iceland. Trees are used as the framework, with turf covering the remainder of the structure giving it a unique appeal. The turf churches in Iceland are preserved as historical monuments.

Hallgrímur Church, Reykjavik

Hall grimur Church, Reykjavik, Iceland
Hallgrímur Church

Overlooking Reykjavik, Hallgrímur Church is a Lutheran church. It took over 40 years to construct and stands at 74.5m in height. A lift ascends the church spire to a viewing deck giving views over Reykjavik.

Hallgrimur Church close architecture with the sweeping lines

Hallgrímur Church’s sweeping architecture is meant to resemble lava cooling into basalt stone

Iceland’s Black Volcanic Landscapes

Breathtaking Icelandic landscapes__black volcanic mountain slopes

Black volcanic mountain slopes

Reminders of Iceland’s volcanic past are everywhere. Currently, there are 30 active volcanoes which comes as no surprise, as the island sits on two tectonic plates which are drifting apart at a pretty rapid rate of around two centimetres per year.

Búðakirkja church

Breathtaking Icelandic landscapes_Búðakirkja black church with a dark stormy backdrop

Búðakirkja church

At this western Iceland location, it’s just you, the Búðakirkja Church and nature. It is a popular photographic location.

Icelandic Horses

Breathtaking Icelandic landscapes__Icelandic horses in a fight

Icelandic Horses

What’s Iceland without the charismatic Icelandic horses? Super friendly, they quickly won our hearts.

Did you know that when Icelandic horses are sold overseas they can never return to the country?

This is to ensure that Icelandic horses remain disease-free. All horses are prohibited from import, thereby ensuring the Icelandic bloodlines are preserved.

Breathtaking Icelandic landscapes__Icelandic horses grazing on the volcanic plains

Icelandic horses grazing on the black lava fields

Diamond Beach

Breathtaking Icelandic landscapes_Diamond Beach with a blue iceberg washed up on the black lava shore

Diamond Beach

Diamond Beach is littered with fragments of icebergs that have flowed from the Jökulsarlon Glacier lagoon down towards the sea to be washed up on the black lava sandy beach. It’s quite a sight and you see that Diamond Beach is aptly named.

Black Lava Cliffs

Breathtaking Icelandic landscapes__black lava western cliffs

Iceland’s black lava western cliffs

Breathtaking Icelandic landscapes__volcanic mountainous slopes

Black lava mountainous slopes

Breathtaking Icelandic landscapes__barren landscapes

Iceland’s colourful but barren landscapes

Sólheimasandur DC3 Wreck

Breathtaking Icelandic landscapes_DC3 Plane Wreck on the flat black lava fields

Sólheimasandur DC3 Wreck

In 1973, this US navy DC3 crash-landed due to unknown factors, but luckily without any loss of life. Its final resting place is within Sólheimasandur, a vast area of black volcanic sands, and a most lonely and desolate spot.

Seyðisfjörður

Breathtaking Icelandic landscapes_ Seydisfjordur town tucked beneath the mountains

Seyðisfjörður, enveloped by mountain ranges

A steep drive over the Fjarðarheiði pass brings you to the colourful town ofSeyðisfjörður, tucked away in the fjords. The town has a healthy cultural scene and interesting street art, making it a popular stopover for cruise ships.

Icelandic Landscapes – That’s a Wrap

If you’re a lover of landscapes then Iceland is definitely worth adding to your bucket list.

Iceland’s landscapes are diverse, and what made the trip really worthwhile was that most places were accessible when self-driving a two-wheel drive car.

Our two weeks spent driving Iceland’s famous Ring Road ensured we had the right amount of time to see what we wanted. Although, with all the magnificent Icelandic landscapes beckoning, we could have easily driven the Ring Road a second time.

Is Iceland on your bucket list? If you’ve visited Iceland before, what was your favourite sight?

This post may contain affiliate links. This means that we may earn a small commission from purchases you make through our links, at no extra cost to you. Thank you for supporting us. For more info, read our Disclosure Policy.


Pin and Save for Later

pintrest pin Icelandic Landscapes

If you liked this post then you can sign up to receive access to heaps of FREE Resources, including travel guides, an awesome 23-page Travel Planner, free wallpapers and monthly notifications of any new posts and other travel-related news.

Are you following us? You can find all our videos on YouTube here and you can also find us on, FacebookInstagramPinterest and Twitter.

READ MORE:


PLANNING YOUR TRAVELS?

These are travel resources we use when planning our trip and can recommend:

Pin It on Pinterest